Le donazioni alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio sono fiscalmente deducibili
secondo la normativa vigente
 
Anche quest'anno è possibile destinare il 5x1000 alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio
Scrivi il numero 80191770587 nella dichiarazione dei redditi

Andrea Riccardi: sul web

Andrea Riccardi: sui social network

Andrea Riccardi: la rassegna stampa

change language
sei in: no pena di morte - news contattinewsletterlink

Sostieni la Comunità

 
20 Giugno 2008 | STATI UNITI

Illinois/USA

La storia di Guin, la donna che voleva morire e che è tornata a vivere dopo la condanna a morte commutata.

 
versione stampabile

DPIC

The Story of a Death Row Inmate Who Wanted to Die

In 1996, Illinois Governor Jim Edgar commuted the death sentence of Guin Garcia to life without parole, even though Garcia herself had stopped fighting for her life. Garcia would have been the first woman executed in the U.S. in two decades. She had been convicted of killing the man who had physically abused her, but she had dropped her appeals because she said she was done "begging for her life." Chicago Sun-Times reporter Carol Marin followed Garcia's case after the commutation and recently wrote about the changes in Garcia's life. Marin told the story of Garcia's early life: her mother's suicide, sexual abuse by her uncle, becoming an alcoholic and prostitute by age 16. Last month, Garcia received an associate degreee in liberal studies from Lake Land College at a graduation ceremony at the Dwight Correctional Center. Fellow graduates at the ceremony pointed to Garcia, now 49, as the reason they earned their GED's, professional certificates, and furthered their education. They called her "Granny" and said she demanded they straighten out their life as she led through example.

 

Sun-Times

A commuted sentence, and a life reborn

CAROL MARIN - Ten days ago, I took a trip I wouldn't have predicted. This is a story about a near-execution, a graduation and a decision by former Gov. Jim Edgar that has delivered unexpected consequences.
It's a story about rising up and reaching down.
In January 1996, Guin Garcia, an inmate on Death Row at Dwight Correctional Center in Downstate Illinois, was on the verge of execution.
Months earlier, Garcia, a 36-year-old convicted double murderer, had dropped her court appeals, said she was done "begging for her life" and put the wheels in motion for her death by lethal injection. It would mark the first execution of a woman in the U.S. in two decades. It became an international story.
Garcia's biography wasn't pretty.
At age 2, she saw her mother jump out a window and die.
Her father split. She was reared by grandparents and an uncle. The uncle began raping her when she was 7, giving her alcohol to calm her and shut her up.
Family members confirm the grandmother knew but did nothing.
By 16, she was an alcoholic and a prostitute. By 17, she was married and pregnant.
Her baby, Sara, was not yet 1 when she suffocated her with a plastic dry cleaning bag rather than face the prospect of DCFS taking Sara away to live with the grandmother and the pedophile uncle.
She confessed, went to prison for 10 years, married one of her tricks, an older man named George Garcia, who once, according to Supreme Court records, genitally mutilated her with a broken bottle.
Drunk one night, she shot and killed George.
Her sorrow over Sara is something Guin Garcia lives with every day. She is not sorry about George.
Fourteen hours before her scheduled execution in 1996, Gov. Edgar, who had signed off on the executions of four men, suddenly stopped the wheels from turning on this one. For a Republican who supported the death penalty, it was not an easy decision. Edgar commuted her sentence to natural life.
Last week, I went back to the prison at Dwight. With a 3.95 "A" average, Garcia was graduating magna cum laude from Lake Land College.
Dressed in caps and gowns, marching to "Pomp and Circumstance," 57 other women received GEDs and certificates in computer technology, commercial cooking, dog training and business management.
Friends and family filled the prison gym. Small children were in their Sunday best, waving to their mothers. There aren't many happy days in prison, said Warden Mary Sigler. This was one.
As one of the inmates rose to claim her diploma, a young man in a back row proudly cried out, "That's my Mom!"
Garcia was last to be called up, the only one that day to accept a college degree, an associate in liberal studies.
You might be asking, what's the point? Why waste tax dollars on a lifer? There's an answer.
It's what Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anna Quindlen calls "Rising up, reaching down."
Graduates I talked to that day, including one who is 28 and has been locked up since she was 15, told me the reason she earned her GED last year and got a certificate in professional dog grooming this year was that Garcia, whom younger inmates call "Granny," demanded that she straighten up and fly right.
Garcia's quest for education helped motivate hers.
That young woman -- a slight, pretty African American -- will get out in two years better prepared to go forward because Guin Garcia, in life's depths, somehow found it in herself to rise up and reach down.
Today, Garcia is 49, with no illusions about getting out. And yet, thanks to a decision by a pro-death penalty governor to spare one life, new life has been given.
Rise up. Reach down.
It can happen anywhere.

NEWS CORRELATE
20 Agosto 2016
STATI UNITI
PENA SOSPESA PER JEFF WOOD

L'ESECUZIONE DI JEFFERY WOOD NON AVRA' LUOGO


LA SUA ESECUZIONE ERA STATA FISSATA PER IL 24 AGOSTO 2016
5 Luglio 2016
CONAKRY, GUINEA
L'abolizione della pena capitale era stata indicata come possibile dal Ministro della Giustizia Cheik Sako nel corso del Convegno promosso a Roma dalla Comunità di Sant'Egidio lo scorso febbraio

Guinea-Conakry: il parlamento ha approvato l'abolizione pena di morte dal codice penale


E' il primo passo per passare dalla moratoria de facto alla moratoria de jure. L'abolizione sarà la tappa successiva
25 Giugno 2016
OSLO, NORVEGIA
Marazziti presenta l'iniziativa della Comunità di Sant'Egidio

"Citiesforlife" a Oslo, come metodo per continuare nella via dell'abolizione #AbolitionNow


A Oslo la marcia degli abolizionisti per le strade della città
20 Giugno 2016
OSLO, NORVEGIA
Inizia oggi il VI Congresso Mondiale Contro la Pena di Morte a Oslo

La Comunità di Sant'Egidio partecipa al Congresso di Oslo con una delegazione da Italia, Congo, Belgio, Spagna, Germania e Indonesia


Sono 1500 gli iscritti provenienti da oltre 80 paesi del mondo, tra loro 20 ministri, 200 diplomatici, parlamentari, accademici, avvocati, associazioni e membri della società civile
4 Giugno 2016
CITTÀ DEL VATICANO
No alla pena di morte e all'ergastolo: "Una pena senza speranza è tortura"

Papa Francesco parlando ai magistrati e giuristi del mondo torna a dire No alla pena di morte

24 Maggio 2016
INDONESIA
La Comunità di Sant'Egidio in Indonesia e le associazioni indonesiane impegnate in difesa dei diritti umani come Kontras, Imparsial, Elsam, Lbh Masyarakat, chiedono di fermare le esecuzioni

La Chiesa e la società civile si mobilitano contro le esecuzioni capitali


Giacarta è tra le 15 città indonesiane dove negli anni scorsi si è tenuta la manifestazione "Città per la vita, città contro la pena di morte" organizzata da Sant'Egidio in oltre duemila comuni nei cinque continenti
tutte le news correlate

RASSEGNA STAMPA CORRELATA
4 Giugno 2016
The Washington Post

Meet the red-state conservatives fighting to abolish the death penalty
23 Maggio 2016
AP

Malaysian death row convict loses final appeal in Singapore
23 Maggio 2016
AsiaNews

Vescovo filippino: È presto per giudicare il contraddittorio Duterte. No alla pena di morte
14 Maggio 2016
Ilsole24ore

Pfizer blocca i farmaci per la pena di morte negli Usa
14 Maggio 2016
La Stampa

Pena di morte, Pfizer blocca l’uso dei suoi farmaci per le iniezioni letali negli Usa
tutta la rassegna stampa correlata

VIDEO FOTO
53
Video promo Cities for Life 2015
3:22

3 visite

2 visite

1 visite

1 visite

7 visite
tutta i media correlati