Le donazioni alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio sono fiscalmente deducibili
secondo la normativa vigente
 
Anche quest'anno è possibile destinare il 5x1000 alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio
Scrivi il numero 80191770587 nella dichiarazione dei redditi

Andrea Riccardi: sul web

Andrea Riccardi: sui social network

Andrea Riccardi: la rassegna stampa

change language
sei in: no pena di morte - news contattinewsletterlink

Sostieni la Comunità

 
19 Giugno 2010 | SINGAPORE

Singapore

Onu, esecuzioni in caduta libera: nel decennio 1998-2008 scese da 242 a 22

 
versione stampabile

IPS

SINGAPORE - Hung Up on the Death Penalty

Stanislaus Jude Chan

SINGAPORE, June 18 - "The strict laws in Singapore have been made fun of, but crime, especially serious ones like murder and drug trafficking, are no laughing matter," said Ivan Tan, a 24-year-old undergraduate.

"The death penalty might be against human rights, but it's the reason we get to live in one of the safest cities in the world," he added.

When it comes to crime and punishment, this island state of five million people has been a lightning rod for derision, mockingly called a myriad of names from "a fine city" to "Disneyland with the death penalty."

But the Singapore government has stood firm on its tough stance, and proudly parades the twin banners of economic strength and low crime rates as symbols of the success of its authoritarian rule.

After all, the country’s leaders have emphasised that Singapore will not follow liberal Western ideologies, and must instead have its own brand of Asian- style democracy.

To be fair, the country has made clear its zero tolerance policy in handling crime. On all inbound flights, for example, passengers are warned that possession of drugs is a crime that carries the death penalty in Singapore.

Under the Singapore Penal Code, the death penalty is meted out on a range of offences, from unlawful discharge of firearms to murder. Any person found in possession of more than the allowed quantity of drugs also receives the mandatory death sentence.

The "mandatory" clause in the death penalty law removes judges’ discretion to impose a lighter sentence.

"Nobody can claim that they don't know the rules. Since these people knowingly challenge the system and break the law, they deserve to get punished," said Irene Ng, a 53-year-old homemaker.

This bustling city boasts one of the highest levels of literacy in the world, but is surprisingly backward when it comes to discussion on issues of human rights.

Singaporeans tend to shy away from the topic, and when pressed for comments on the subject, turn conveniently to government-sanctioned answers, routinely replicated arguments against freedom of expression and other civil group concerns: that the death penalty is a necessary evil, and to succumb to international pressure in these matters is to risk destroying the fabric of society.

The mandatory death penalty for serious drug offences here is a "trade-off" the government makes to protect "thousands of lives" that may be ruined if illegal drugs were freely available, Law Minister and Second Home Affairs Minister K Shanmugam said at a dialogue session in May.

While the United Nations Commission on Human Rights adopted a resolution calling for the establishment of moratoria on executions in 2003, Singapore has been adamant in its decision to remain one of the few nations worldwide with the mandatory death penalty.

"Thousands of lives have been ruined due to the free availability of drugs" in cities such as Sydney and New York, Shanmugam said. "You save one life here, but 10 other lives will be gone. What will your choice be?"

Singapore improved from first to fifth position in the world for number of executions per capita between 2004 and 2008. The city hanged more than one per million population each year, behind Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait and North Korea, with China ranking a close sixth.

According to the latest U.N. report on capital punishment released at the end of 2009, the number of executions in Singapore has dropped dramatically from 242 in 1994-1998, and 138 in 1999-2003, to 22 in 2004-2008.

But the recent case of Yong Vui Kong has brought the mandatory death penalty in Singapore back into the limelight.

The 22-year-old Malaysian was convicted in 2008 of smuggling 47 grammes of heroin into Singapore. Lawyers representing Yong argued that the mandatory death sentence violates international standards and human rights laws.

"This is a young man, only 22, who committed a non-violent offence," Saul Lehrfreund, co-founder of the Death Penalty Project, a London-based group that appeals against death sentences, told the media in May. "The court in Singapore has no choice but to impose death by hanging, regardless of the individual circumstances of the case. In this day and age, that just seems ludicrous."

Kong, whom lawyers describe as "impoverished and vulnerable," was due to be hanged in December until lawyers obtained an emergency reprieve. The case is regarded by experts as an important challenge to the country’s death penalty law and has attracted media attention across Asia, where executing people for drug offences remains controversial.

Taiwan recently abolished the mandatory death penalty. China, which continues to execute prisoners for 68 different offences including 44 non- violent crimes, allows judicial discretion in sentencing drug-related cases. In Singapore's defence, Attorney General Walter Woon has argued that parliament has the power to show mercy in individual cases.

"It can't be right that an administrative body not amenable to judicial review effectively becomes the sentencing body," said Lehrfreund. "There is a clear global trend away from sentencing people to death without taking their age, vulnerability and other powerful mitigating factors into account."

"The mandatory death penalty is barbaric. And what makes it worse in these cases involving drugs is that the accused is not presumed innocent until proven guilty. On the contrary, the burden is on lawyers of the accused to prove that he is innocent without doubt," said Joshua, a 38-year-old lawyer who was concerned about possible backlash and requested to be identified only by his first name.

"What this means is both simple and gruesome. That, sadly, considering how far we have advanced as a nation, it is still possible for an innocent man to be hanged in Singapore," he added.

NEWS CORRELATE
20 Agosto 2016
STATI UNITI
PENA SOSPESA PER JEFF WOOD

L'ESECUZIONE DI JEFFERY WOOD NON AVRA' LUOGO


LA SUA ESECUZIONE ERA STATA FISSATA PER IL 24 AGOSTO 2016
5 Luglio 2016
CONAKRY, GUINEA
L'abolizione della pena capitale era stata indicata come possibile dal Ministro della Giustizia Cheik Sako nel corso del Convegno promosso a Roma dalla Comunità di Sant'Egidio lo scorso febbraio

Guinea-Conakry: il parlamento ha approvato l'abolizione pena di morte dal codice penale


E' il primo passo per passare dalla moratoria de facto alla moratoria de jure. L'abolizione sarà la tappa successiva
25 Giugno 2016
OSLO, NORVEGIA
Marazziti presenta l'iniziativa della Comunità di Sant'Egidio

"Citiesforlife" a Oslo, come metodo per continuare nella via dell'abolizione #AbolitionNow


A Oslo la marcia degli abolizionisti per le strade della città
20 Giugno 2016
OSLO, NORVEGIA
Inizia oggi il VI Congresso Mondiale Contro la Pena di Morte a Oslo

La Comunità di Sant'Egidio partecipa al Congresso di Oslo con una delegazione da Italia, Congo, Belgio, Spagna, Germania e Indonesia


Sono 1500 gli iscritti provenienti da oltre 80 paesi del mondo, tra loro 20 ministri, 200 diplomatici, parlamentari, accademici, avvocati, associazioni e membri della società civile
4 Giugno 2016
CITTÀ DEL VATICANO
No alla pena di morte e all'ergastolo: "Una pena senza speranza è tortura"

Papa Francesco parlando ai magistrati e giuristi del mondo torna a dire No alla pena di morte

24 Maggio 2016
INDONESIA
La Comunità di Sant'Egidio in Indonesia e le associazioni indonesiane impegnate in difesa dei diritti umani come Kontras, Imparsial, Elsam, Lbh Masyarakat, chiedono di fermare le esecuzioni

La Chiesa e la società civile si mobilitano contro le esecuzioni capitali


Giacarta è tra le 15 città indonesiane dove negli anni scorsi si è tenuta la manifestazione "Città per la vita, città contro la pena di morte" organizzata da Sant'Egidio in oltre duemila comuni nei cinque continenti
tutte le news correlate

RASSEGNA STAMPA CORRELATA
4 Giugno 2016
The Washington Post

Meet the red-state conservatives fighting to abolish the death penalty
23 Maggio 2016
AP

Malaysian death row convict loses final appeal in Singapore
23 Maggio 2016
AsiaNews

Vescovo filippino: È presto per giudicare il contraddittorio Duterte. No alla pena di morte
14 Maggio 2016
Ilsole24ore

Pfizer blocca i farmaci per la pena di morte negli Usa
14 Maggio 2016
La Stampa

Pena di morte, Pfizer blocca l’uso dei suoi farmaci per le iniezioni letali negli Usa
tutta la rassegna stampa correlata

VIDEO FOTO
53
Video promo Cities for Life 2015
3:22

3 visite

2 visite

1 visite

1 visite

7 visite
tutta i media correlati