Le donazioni alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio sono fiscalmente deducibili
secondo la normativa vigente
Anche quest'anno è possibile destinare il 5x1000 alla Comunità di Sant'Egidio
Scrivi il numero 80191770587 nella dichiarazione dei redditi

Andrea Riccardi: sul web

Andrea Riccardi: sui social network

Andrea Riccardi: la rassegna stampa

change language
sei in: no pena di morte - news contattinewsletterlink

Sostieni la Comunità

12 Aprile 2011 | STATI UNITI


Cosa c'è nel "cocktail" usato per l'iniezione letale? Il New York Times prova a far luce

versione stampabile

New York Times

The latest controversy over the always controversial subject of capital punishment: the drugs used to execute people on death row.

Lawyers for death row inmates in Texas and Arizona have filed challenges to the executions questioning the use of specific drugs in the lethal injection of their clients. (Last week, the Supreme Court stayed the executions for other reasons.)
These challenges have been prompted by a shortage of one of the drugs, sodium thiopental, an anesthetic. The American manufacturer of sodium thiopental, Hospira, recently announced that it would no longer produce the drug, and manufacturers in Europe do not want to supply the drug if it will be used in executions. Some executions have been postponed while states try to sort out the drug situation.
In Texas, which carries out more executions than any other state, the controversy is focused on the proposed switch from sodium thiopental to pentobarbital in a 3-drug cocktail.
What is the difference?
The 2 drugs come from the same family: barbiturates, drugs that depress the central nervous system. So, in general, said Dr. John Dombrowski, director of the Washington Pain Center and a board member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, “it’s like if you ask me what’s the difference between Johnnie Walker Blue, Black and Red — they’re all scotch.”
But sodium thiopental has been commonly used as an anesthetic in hospitals. Pentobarbital has a few medical uses in humans, but is often used by veterinarians to anesthetize or euthanize animals. It has also been used in physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and in Europe.
When injected into the bloodstream, both drugs “cross the blood-brain barrier very efficiently,” said Dr. Scott Segal, chairman of the department of anesthesiology at Tufts Medical Center in Boston. “They get into brain tissue itself.”
Within the brain tissue, on the surface of the neurons, he said, are receptors that respond to a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA.
“GABA is an inhibitory receptor, meaning that stimulation of the GABA receptor reduces firing of neurons,” Dr. Segal said, depressing the brain’s electrical activity.
Both drugs stimulate these GABA receptors.
“All barbiturates put the brain to sleep by slowing down brain function,” said Dr. Mark A. Warner, president of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. “The brain cells that drive the desire to breathe are also suppressed. So any barbiturate, if you give enough of it, somebody quits breathing. Also, if you give enough of it the heart quits pumping as hard and that can cause decreased blood pressure.”
But while the way the drugs work might be similar, the effects are different.
Sodium thiopental is used in hospitals because it “has a relatively fast onset and it doesn’t last long,” Dr. Warner said. “You want a patient to go sleep and wake up pretty quickly.”
Pentobarbital is a long-acting drug.
“If veterinarians are using this, they don’t really care if an animal wakes up faster or not,” Dr. Dombrowski said. “If the dog or cat is still a little sleepy it doesn’t make a difference."
In euthanizing animals, higher doses are used, and “the lethal effect is a cardiovascular effect,” Dr. Segal said, meaning that it stops the heart.
Pentobarbitol is used in hospitals in certain circumstances, like inducing a coma in brain-damaged patients because “that allows the brain to use more energy and oxygen to repair itself,” Dr. Warner said. He said it can also be used to stop seizures in patients for whom other drugs are ineffective.
Opponents of the death penalty object to either drug. Some say thiopental can wear off too quickly, allowing inmates to feel pain.
Others object to using pentobarbital, because it is so infrequently used in humans.
In the three-step cocktail common in executions, a barbiturate is given with pancuronium bromide, a paralyzing drug, and potassium chloride, which induces cardiac arrest. Dr. Segal said all three drugs can have lethal effects.
“I’m not sure anyone knows which drug actually kills someone,” he said.
In fact, one can do the job. Ohio has used both barbiturates by themselves in executions.

13 Ottobre 2016
Dopo caso di Sagamihara, quando nel luglio scorso un giovane armato di un coltello aveva ucciso 19 persone e in una struttura per disabili, è urgente raccogliere tutti coloro che credono in una giustizia che rispetti la vita.

Sant'Egidio: 14 ottobre a Tokyo la Conferenza No Justice Without Life

Giornata che raccoglie parlamentari, testimoni, uomini di religione per l'abolizione della pena di morte in Giappone
10 Ottobre 2016
10 ottobre giornata mondiale contro la pena capitale

In occasione della 14ma giornata mondiale contro la pena di morte una conferenza in Giappone dal titolo "No Justice Without Life"

Tamara Chikunova con la Comunità di Sant'Egidio incontra i detenuti nelle carceri italiane
20 Agosto 2016


5 Luglio 2016
L'abolizione della pena capitale era stata indicata come possibile dal Ministro della Giustizia Cheik Sako nel corso del Convegno promosso a Roma dalla Comunità di Sant'Egidio lo scorso febbraio

Guinea-Conakry: il parlamento ha approvato l'abolizione pena di morte dal codice penale

E' il primo passo per passare dalla moratoria de facto alla moratoria de jure. L'abolizione sarà la tappa successiva
25 Giugno 2016
Marazziti presenta l'iniziativa della Comunità di Sant'Egidio

"Citiesforlife" a Oslo, come metodo per continuare nella via dell'abolizione #AbolitionNow

A Oslo la marcia degli abolizionisti per le strade della città
20 Giugno 2016
Inizia oggi il VI Congresso Mondiale Contro la Pena di Morte a Oslo

La Comunità di Sant'Egidio partecipa al Congresso di Oslo con una delegazione da Italia, Congo, Belgio, Spagna, Germania e Indonesia

Sono 1500 gli iscritti provenienti da oltre 80 paesi del mondo, tra loro 20 ministri, 200 diplomatici, parlamentari, accademici, avvocati, associazioni e membri della società civile
tutte le news correlate

4 Giugno 2016
The Washington Post

Meet the red-state conservatives fighting to abolish the death penalty
23 Maggio 2016

Malaysian death row convict loses final appeal in Singapore
23 Maggio 2016

Vescovo filippino: È presto per giudicare il contraddittorio Duterte. No alla pena di morte
14 Maggio 2016

Pfizer blocca i farmaci per la pena di morte negli Usa
14 Maggio 2016
La Stampa

Pena di morte, Pfizer blocca l’uso dei suoi farmaci per le iniezioni letali negli Usa
tutta la rassegna stampa correlata

Video promo Cities for Life 2015

6 visite

2 visite

1 visite

1 visite

7 visite
tutta i media correlati